Guest Lecturer for Futuna Lecture Series 2018 – Peter Clegg – Architect and founding Partner of Feilden Clegg Bradley, London

 

“Architecture is an art form but also social science and we have a duty not only to work with our current client base and generate ideas collaboratively, but also think ahead and envisage the needs of future generations who are our ultimate clients.”

The Friends of Futuna Charitable Trust is delighted to announce that Architect Peter Clegg from England will present the 8th Futuna Lecture Series in New Zealand during March 2018. 

Peter Clegg established Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios (FCB) with Richard Feilden in 1978. Peter is the Senior Partner and the practice is widely regarded as a key pioneer in the field of environmental design. Peter has nearly 40 years experience in low energy architecture and is actively involved in research, design and education. He has chaired the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) awards nationally and internationally between 2012 to 2014 and holds a professorship at Bath University.

Being one of the first practices in the UK to develop expertise in sustainable design, FCB have consistently remained at the forefront of research and innovation. They are now regarded as one of the UK’s leading practices in low-energy design after refining their approach to sustainability over the last 30 years.

Their work resonates on many other levels and has been recognised with a substantial number of major awards including the 2008 RIBA Stirling Prize – the UK’s most prestigious architectural award presented to Accordia, a scheme which is widely regarded as setting a new benchmark for housing in the UK.

FCB were Stirling nominated in 2014 for their Manchester School of Art design and have won more RIBA Regional and National Awards than any other practice in the last decade.

Most recently, FCB were named the BD Sustainability Architect of the Year 2016.

FCB’s current projects include the redevelopment of Brighton Dome, the refurbishment and renewal of the Queen Elizabeth Hall, Purcell Room and Hayward Gallery complex at the Southbank Centre, as well as several new schools and university buildings.

Peter’s active involvement in education projects includes Broadcasting Place for Leeds Metropolitan University, a new School of Engineering in Toronto and an Academy in Bangladesh. His work in this sector led him to become primary author of Learning from Schools, which focuses on FCBStudios award-winning school building programme. He was made Royal Designer for Industry (RDI) in 2010.

Peter will give three lectures for the Futuna Lecture Series:

  • Auckland on Wednesday 7th March (venue to be confirmed)
  • Christchurch on Thursday 8th March (St. Andrew’s College Chapel)
  • Wellington on Saturday 11th March and will be held, for the 8th year running, in the Futuna Chapel in Karori.

Peter will be talking about his architectural philosophy and vision – demonstrating how these are incorporated into his work and his practice.

Ticketing details will be announced December 2018. Tickets will be available online at Dash Tickets in January 2018. There will be 15 CPD points available for NZ registered architects.

The Futuna Lecture Series is the largest annual fundraising event for the Friends of Futuna Chartable Trust – we would like to thank the following partners who without, the lecture series would not be possible.

  • Dulux NZ
  • Metalcraft Roofing
  • The Warren Trust
  • Auckland, Christchurch and Wellington branches of the NZIA
  • Plytech

The support we receive has allowed us to bring this unique lecture series to New Zealand for the 8th year running.

 

ACCORDIA CITATION                   RIBA STIRLING PRIZE 2008

 

The design includes a variety of innovative house and apartment types in the form of terraces, courtyard houses and ‘set-piece’ apartment buildings, composed within public landscaped gardens that extend to approximately three hectares.  The project is an exemplary urban environment: a desirable place to live that balances usable private space within an overall structure of high quality public space.

 

BEDALES SCHOOL                                          RIBA AWARD 2017

 

 

This year The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has awarded FCB Studio a RIBA National Award for Bedales School. It is set in an area of outstanding natural beauty on the edge of the South Downs National Park in the village of Steep near Petersfield. It has been constructed around a substantial and beautiful oak tree within a new court and central lawn and has a strong sense of place.           

FCB Studios have also been selected as the winners of the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) competition to design the new Faculty of Arts Building at the University of Warwick, in Coventry, England. Lauded for its flexibility and collaboration-fostering design, the winning proposal was selected over finalist entries from Foster + Partners, Grimshaw, White Arkitekter and Wilkinson Eyre.

 

 

STANBROOK ABBEY YORKSHIRE                2009 – 2015photo by Tim Crocker

Stanbrook Abbey is a new home for the Conventus of Our Lady of Consolation, a Benedictine community of nuns who devote their lives to study, work and prayer. Relocating from their old Victorian home in Worcestershire, the nuns’ contemplative way of life required spaces that were simple, tranquil and beautiful, or as they put it in their monastic vision brief – a place where they could ‘pray always’.

Located in the North York Moors National Park the new site was chosen by the nuns for its “special quality of silence and light” providing them with a peaceful setting for their contemplative life and far-reaching views over the Vale of York.

The project was completed over two phases. Phase I, completed in 2009, included 26 new private cells for the nuns along the southern edge of the site, shared kitchen and dining facilities and work rooms. Phase II, completed in 2015, involved the construction of the new Community Church and Chapel, the Chapter House and guest spaces. 

 

photo by Tim Crocker

“The colours most commonly associated with nuns are black and white. The women of Stanbrook Abbey can now add a dash of green to their palette following their move to the world’s first environmentally friendly nunnery.

Located in the North York Moors national park, the £4.7m building features solar panels to provide hot water, a woodchip boiler, rainwater harvesting for laundry and toilet flushing and a roof covered in sedum grass to insulate the building and attract local wildlife.”

 

Riazat Butt

Religious affairs correspondent

The Guardian 2009