Chapel of Futuna

Colours of Futuna Concert Series 2016

Sunday afternoon concert series

Weekly from 24th January to 20th March inclusive, at 2pm

Poster side panel

Some of Wellington’s most outstanding soloists, chamber music ensembles and choirs perform in an exciting line-up of concerts over the summer.

Experience the seasons’ progression through the light-filled windows of John Scott’s Chapel of Futuna in Karori, whilst enjoying the very best of New Zealand music.

The concert series is being finalised at this time, but already confirmed are concerts by Bernard Wells, Simon’s Strings, Nikau Trio, Lala Simpson, NZ Harp Duo, and Wososi.

WCC - Logo with Te Reo_Black on White_CMYKThis year the concert series is is supported by the WCC through their Arts and Culture Grants programme.

More information can be found on the Colours of Futuna Concert Series 2016 page.

GUEST LECTURER FOR FUTUNA LECTURE SERIES 2016

LENE TRANBERG – ARCHITECT

ARCHITECT MAA / PARTNER LUNDGAARD & TRANBERG ARCHITECTS

Lene Tranberg s_h

Lene Tranberg

The Friends of Futuna Charitable Trust is delighted to announce that architect Lene Tranberg from Denmark will be the Futuna guest lecturer in 2016 and present the 6th Futuna Lecture Series in New Zealand during March 2016.

Lene will give three lectures commencing in Auckland at the Art Gallery auditorium on Wednesday 16th March followed by Christchurch on Thursday 17th March. The Wellington lecture will be held in the Futuna Chapel on Saturday 19th March.

“A building should be generous. It should give more than it takes. It should take part in the life of the city and give something away for free”.

More information about Lene and the lecture series is available here.

Futuna Chapel Open Day 2016

Sunday 20th March 2016 (Entry by Koha)

The Friends of Futuna Charitable Trust are delighted to announce that Megan Wraight, one of NZ’s foremost landscape architects, will give a public talk at the Futuna Open Day on Sunday 20th March at Futuna Chapel at 3:30pm. NZ registered architects will receive 10 CPD points and must register with NZIA and/or NZRAB.

mw-1

Megan Wraight

Megan’s practice undertook the research and design for the Futuna Chapel landscape in 2012 and the Trust is very appreciative of this generous pro bono contribution to the continued ‘restoration’ of the Chapel to a public life.

  • Bachelor of Landscape Architecture – Hons. RMIT University, Melbourne, 1992
  • Certificate of Amenity Horticulture, Capal Manor Environment Centre, London, 1986
  • Registered Member and Fellow, New Zealand Institute of Landscape Architects (NZILA)
  • New Zealand Arts Foundation Laureate

For more information about the Futuna Chapel open day please go to the Futua Chapel Open Day 2016 page.

 

Last open day for 2015 will be held on Sunday 6 December 2015

11:00am to 3:00pm

The Trust wishes to continue the initiatives of previous years to ensure that the Chapel is available to the public as much as possible. Following Easter the Chapel will continue to be open on the first Sunday of each month until the end of the year. The hours of opening will be 11:00am to 3:00pm.

Visitors will be able to wander freely around the chapel. Volunteers will be on hand to assist in pointing out items of interest in the Chapel and answer questions.

John Scott’s Chapel of Futuna

In 1958, six years into his private practice, Hawke’s Bay architect John Scott was commissioned by the Society of Mary to design a chapel for their spiritual retreat in Karori, Wellington.

Built by the Brothers of the Society themselves, and embellished by Auckland sculptor Jim Allen, Futuna Chapel opened in 1961 and immediately became a talking point among architects and a mecca for aspiring members of the profession.

In the 50 years since, this little private building hidden away the Wellington suburb of Karori has become generally regarded as an architectural masterpiece and perhaps the most complete example of a true modern ‘indigenous’ New Zealand design.

Nearly Lost

In 1958, six years into his private practice, Hawke’s Bay architect John Scott was commissioned by the Society of Mary to design a chapel for their spiritual retreat in Karori, Wellington.

Built by the Brothers of the Society themselves, and embellished by Auckland sculptor Jim Allen, Futuna Chapel opened in 1961 and immediately became a talking point among architects and a mecca for aspiring members of the profession.

In the 50 years since, this little private building hidden away the Wellington suburb of Karori has become generally regarded as an architectural masterpiece and perhaps the most complete example of a true modern ‘indigenous’ New Zealand design.

Nearly Lost

In 2000, the Society of Mary had no further use for the Futuna complex and sold it to developers. While the 66 residential units now forming Futuna Village were being built, the chapel itself was used as a materials store. While tarnished, most of the fixtures and fittings remain in good condition. In 2000 Jim Allen’s magnificent Jesus figure disappeared from the Chapel and remained at large for 12 years until its recovery in 2012.

Concern about the building’s future came from many quarters, but not until the Friends of Futuna Charitable Trust was formed and negotiations with the developers began in earnest was it possible to say that this valuable part of our culture was almost safe.

Safe at last – but money still required!

Friends of Futuna Charitable Trust has now completed the purchase of the Chapel and the parcel of land that it sits on.  The Trust’s main task now is to raise the required funds to complete the planned exterior restoration, and to ensure the future maintenance and operation of the building. You can learn about donating to the Trust here.

Join the Society!

The Friends of Futuna Society has been established by the Trust with the aim of seeking membership from the national and local community to assist with the ongoing maintenance and operating costs of the chapel, support events as well as contribute to the funding of the establishment and maintenance of a Futuna Chapel/John Scott Archive. Membership of the Society will be through an annual subscription. – learn more about the Society here.

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